Image: PetCure Oncology

Cancer in Animals

Overview

Sadly, companion animals are at risk of getting cancer just like people. Of the estimated 70 to 80 million dogs and 74 to 96 million cats in the United States:

  • 6 million new cancer diagnoses are made in dogs each year1
  • A similar number of cancer diagnoses are made in cats each year1
  • 50% of dogs over the age of 10 get some form of cancer1
  • Cancer accounts for nearly 50% of all disease-related pet deaths each year2
  • Approximately 1 in 4 dogs develops a tumor of some kind during their life3
  • Although cancer is not as common in cats as it is in dogs, the cancers found in cats tend to be more aggressive4
  • Cancer has become the number one cause of death in older cats and dogs5
  • Certain breeds of dogs and cats are more susceptible to developing cancer

The most common cancers in animals

There are nearly 100 types of animal cancer. Dogs and cats get many of the same types of cancers that people do, including:

  • Bladder cancer
  • Bone cancer
  • Brain tumors
  • Breast cancer
  • Colon cancer
  • Head and neck cancer
  • Leukemia
  • Liver cancer
  • Lymphoma
  • Pancreatic cancer
  • Prostate cancer
  • Skin cancer
  • Soft-tissue sarcoma
  • Spinal tumors
  • Testicular cancer
  • Thyroid cancer

But there is reason to hope

Many of the advanced cancer treatment options available to humans today are also available to help our pets — including an advanced form of radiation therapy known as stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Plus, dogs and cats respond to this treatment the same way humans do, so they can live longer, healthier lives.

1 National Cancer Institute Center for Cancer Research
2The Veterinary Cancer Center
3American Veterinary Medical Association
4Blue Buffalo Foundation for Cancer Research
5National Veterinary Cancer Registry

BACK TO TOP